Marinade

I have been thinking about migration, gender, and identity (again) and came across Gloria Anzaldua's words, worth sharing in full:

 Living in a state of psychics unrest, in a Borderland, is what makes poets write and artists create. It is like a cactus needle embedded in the flesh. It worries itself deeper and deeper, and I keep aggravating it by poking at it. When it begins to fester I have to do something to put an end to the aggravation and to figure out why I have it. I get deep down into the place wher it is rooted in my skin and pluck away at it, playing it like a musical instrument--the fingers pressing, making the pain worse before it can get better. Then out it comes. No more disconfort, no more ambivalence. Until another needle pierces the skin. That's what writing is for me, an endless cycle of making it worse, making it better, but always making meaning out of experience, whatever it may be (Borderlands, 95).
Keeping myself honest with a 30 minute endeavor; featuring one of my companion cacti.

Keeping myself honest with a 30 minute endeavor; featuring one of my companion cacti.

My preoccupation with forced migration, and subsequent displacement also led me to artist Tiffany Chung's work shedding a light on global humanitarian crises through cartographic imagery. More on this theme soon.

Tiffany Chung  one giant great flood 2050 , 2012  Image courtesy:   SFMOMA

Tiffany Chung one giant great flood 2050, 2012

Image courtesy: SFMOMA